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Hang on.. school holidays are nearly here!

Tis the season… to batten down the hatches parents. School holidays are fast approaching, but first, the last two weeks of school need to be survived! We can do it. Hang on!

We all know what I”m talking about. That last two weeks of term. The tireds. The tanties. The “I just can’t be bothereds” and that’s just us let alone our kids.

You are not alone. Almost every parent of school kids is on the same journey.

5 tips to get you through the next fortnight:

  1. Pick your battles.

    This is the time of year to let a ‘tude or two slide, the time of year to cut your kid some slack, but not if they’re being disrespectful. It’s okay for them to lose their cool, but not at you. You are not a punching bag. Let them cool off in their own way – often hiding in their room or jumping on the trampoline for two hours! Let them know it’s okay to lose it occasionally, but not at others. Teach them how to handle the ‘meltdowns’ of life. They’ll need it as adults too!

  2. Don’t micro manage.

    This is the busy time of year. We’re in a hurry. Nothing sets teens, and primary school kids off more than having their every move controlled, planned, manouvered and checked. Give them some space. 

  3. Prioritise.

    You don’t have to do everything. There will be carols nights, fireworks nights, award ceremonies, concerts, mini concerts, parades, tree lightings, break up parties etc etc etc You don’t have to attend everything you’re invited to. It’s okay to prioritise what’s important to you and your family, and let everything else slide.

  4. Relax. Chill. Destress.

    Kids pick up parent’s anxieties. Take an extra 10 minutes at night as you collapse into bed to meditate. Try getting up 10 minutes earlier and meditating of a morning. Long. Deep. Regular breaths are crucial as is remaining grateful – keep that gratitude list replaying in your head. When you’re stuck in traffic, running 10 minutes late for your child’s “insert any activity”, and all the mummy guilt in the world is running through your head and heart.. take a big breath, relax your shoulders and think of some things you’re grateful for. You’ll be late. That’s life.

  5. Have something to look forward to.

    Over dinner one night get a piece of paper and have each child come up with a school holiday FREE event that you can all do as a family. Their answers may surprise you. Set a date that you WILL do each. Write these on a sheet of paper, put them on the fridge. This gives you all something to look forward to, and reminds you just two weeks to go, you can make it! 

Enjoy as much of the last two weeks as you can – swimming carnivals, school discos, carols nights, performance nights/days, awards days/nights, parent teacher interviews, excursions, break up parties etc etc etc.

HANG ON..we’re nearly there, then the real fun begins 😉 

Have you joined our Facebook group yet? You can do so HERE

Looking for a book for your teens for Christmas? Check out Beyond School: Practical Tips for Teens HERE

Love

Jo

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The power of a ‘thank you’… and why it’s important to teach this to our kids and teens.

 

Thank you. We teach it to our kids from an early age, and often times it can get lost along the way. But why is it so important? Below are just three of the many reasons to say thank you, expect it to be said to you and if you’re a parent, make it a standard response in your life and your kid’s lives.

  1. Gratitude

Saying thank you shows the recipient you are grateful, you appreciate their effort and what they’ve done for you. 

Gratitude is a virtue that benefits both sides of the table. When children, teens and adults say thank you they are showing their gratitude, out loud. When they don’t it can leave the giver feeling resentful. Teaching kids and teens to be grateful opens up a whole world for them. Check out our chapter on Gratitude in our book Beyond School: Practical Tips for Teens

2. Personal engagement

Saying thank you engages the recipient and the giver. And when I say recipient and giver I”m not talking just of gifts, I”m talking of actions, of gestures, of thoughts, of the little things we as humans do for each other every day. In an age where eyes are down on devices far too often, engagement is something we need to hold on tight too. A thank you makes you stop and take stock of what was done for you and how appreciative of that you are (or should be).

3. Respect

Saying thank you is also respectful. Show respect, get respect. When we say thank you we are giving a verbal sign of respect, a nod to the giver. If you want your children to respect others, teach them to genuinely be thankful for the things others do for them, the ‘things’ they get etc. and most importantly, role model the thank you.

 

Let’s bring thank you back.

You’re welcome xo